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Ceramic Vs Induction Hob

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In the kitchen, everyone strives to achieve efficiency in cooking. You want to have the best appliances in the kitchen in terms of quality, capacity, capability, and size. In most cases, there are several appliances in each category. Chefs or cooking enthusiasts are thus forced to choose one cookware over the other in each category.

Ceramic Vs Induction Hob

The ceramic and the induction hob resemble each other but have different price tags. The induction hob is more expensive than the ceramic hob. But why? This article discusses both appliances in detail so that you can make an informed decision when making a purchase. 


Ceramic Hob

In most cases a ceramic hob is an electric hob with a ceramic glass surface. Halogen, induction, and gas on glass are also variations of ceramic hobs but less common. For this article, we’ll refer to an electric hob as the ceramic hob. 

Ceramic hobs are cheaper than induction hobs for several reasons. You, however, get fewer controls with the ceramic hob. They heat up quickly, thus making them an ideal alternative. Even so, they take longer to cool down, which causes more residual heat to escape. Their temperature control is also somewhat poor. 

ceramic vs induction hob

How It Works

Heating elements are fitted under the electric ceramic hobs. When switched on, the elements heat the surface of the hob ring. The heat is then transferred to the cookware through conduction. When you heat the hob ring, it stays warm for some time after being turned off, which is advantageous too.  

Features

1. Heat Indicators

Most ceramic hobs have heat indicators in the form of a red light that shines a red light to indicate the hob is still warm. This interesting feature makes them significantly safe. Despite having a safety feature, you should prevent the kids from playing with the hob to avoid burning themselves. 

2. Easy To Clean

Cleaning ceramic hobs is seamless. One simple swipe, and they get clean. Nonetheless, you should prevent food from spilling on the top to avoid it from burning since it becomes very problematic to remove. 

3. Compatability

A ceramic hob is highly compatible. You can use virtually any pot or pan for cooking with it. 

PROS

  • Cheaper option
  • Heats up quickly
  • Easy to clean

CONS

  • Less efficient
  • Not very safe for children
  • Poor heat distribution

Induction Hob

An induction hob is a complex appliance that uses electromagnetism to heat up and cook food. The technology used to generate heat is very different from a ceramic hob. The hob uses a high frequency alternating magnetic field to cook food. The magnetic field involves a tightly wound copper coil and is activated via switching on the gadget. 

An induction hob is very popular in today's kitchens. They have many benefits ranging from flexibility to excellent temperature control. You can get food from boiling to simmering easily. 

Unlike the ceramic hob, the surface does not get hot. Only the cooking appliance gets hot. You, therefore, don't have to worry about spilt food. You wipe with a cloth and continue cooking.

ceramic vs induction hob

How It Works

An induction hob transfers heat indirectly because it heats your pan via electrical induction. Copper coils are fitted beneath the ceramic glass surface. When you switch on the gadget, electricity runs via the coils creating a magnetic field.

Interestingly, you place ferrous metal cookware anywhere on the surface of the induction hob. The magnetic field only heats the base of the pan and cooks your food. The surface that’s not occupied by the pan does not heat up. Also, the surface does not heat up when nothing is placed. 

Features

1. Automatic Fans

An induction hob is fitted with automatic fans that cool down the coils when the food is ready, and you need to minimize the temperatures or switch it off.

2. Zoneless Design

Some models feature zoneless designs. You can therefore place your pot or pan anywhere on the ceramic glass surface.

3. Heat Indicators

Induction hobs are fitted with heat indicators to signal when the surfaces are still hot. Besides the indicators, these types of hobs are generally safer for children.

PROS

  • It heats up and cools down quickly
  • Zoneless options
  • Highly responsive
  • Energy effecient

CONS

  • Expensive
  • Non-compatibility with many pots and pans
  • Must be installed by a professional

Ceramic vs Induction Hob: Similarities

You can’t differentiate between the two appliances at first glance. Some of their similarities include;

  • Control

Most ceramic and induction hobs feature touch dials on the front side for controlling the appliances. Also, most models have a child-safe feature that prevents operation unless the feature is unlocked. Both gadgets have heat indicators to show specific hot zones. 

  • Appearance

Both gadgets are made of smooth, flat, toughened glass. Both the surfaces are marked with a white line to indicate the exact location to place your pots or pans.

  • Power

Both gadgets are powered by electricity. Larger often require a dedicated power supply. If the power supply isn’t available, there are some plug-and-play options.


  • Ceramic Hob

    Induction Hob

  • Controls

    Touch dials

    Touch dials

  • Appearance

    Made of glass

    Made of glass

  • Power

    Electricity

    Electricity

  • Flexi-zone feature

    X

  • Energy Effecient

    X

  • Pan Compatibility

    Any

    Magnetic pan

  • Price

    Less expensive

    Expensive

What Are The Differences Between A Ceramic And An Induction Hob

  • Features

Due to the dwindling usage of ceramic hobs, they have fewer features than their counterparts, whose usage is rising. For instance, you will find induction hobs with innovative features such as Flexi-zone, built-in colour display, powerslide, and hob hood. 

  • Heating

The design of a ceramic hob involves a heating element underneath each zone. When turned on, the whole area is heated. The technique wastes a lot of heat which makes them less energy efficient. In addition, the large heated surface area cools down slowly. 

Otherwise, an induction hob only heats the surface that comes into contact with the pan; thus, heating and cooling are quick (only the residue heat stuck in the glass cools down). The technique is also safe because the chances of heat leakage are zero.

  • Pan Compatibility

You must use a magnetic pan with the induction hob due to the electromagnetic reaction. Therefore, the pans must be made of ferrous metals such as aluminium, cast iron, or magnetic stainless steel. On the other hand, a ceramic hob works with any pan. 

  • Price

Induction hobs are generally expensive when compared to ceramic hobs. 


Ceramic Vs Induction Hob: Summing Up

An induction hob is a darling appliance. It’s a new product equipped with excellent features from the onset compared to a ceramic hob that is gradually being pushed out of the market. 

All factors held constant, always purchase an induction hob over the ceramic counterpart due to the special focus by manufacturers. It would be best if you only got a ceramic hob when your budget is stressed. 

Did you know that the higher price tag on the induction hob is due to extras such as built-in safety features and economic design?

Still can't decide? Check out our gas vs induction hob analysis.

Cate Nderi